The Ghost Game

Communication / The AA App.

Today, I’m digging again on the side of my too awesome app: the AA App.
I’m not tired of its name: so it must be a good name & easy to remember.

I absolutely want it to have a Game dimension – and not just one game, but a continuous stream of different games – all easy and fast, all related to the show and the link between the spectator and the show and/or the video game.

I get it from Altair – this App is meant to be Altair’s advertising wherever it develops.

Well I get lost – back to my subject : the Ghost Game

yes, I loved playing this game and sucking up ghosts – okay, I am very childish.

Here is a game that I like very much, that I invented myself and that works very very very well – especially with a young audience – my target audience.
So this is the principle of the Ghost Game.

Normally when you play, you start with nothing and you play to win.
I’ve reversed the principle: in the Ghost Game, you lose at the start and you play to leave with nothing.

If exactly now you think: ‘Oh no’ – then that means I’ve won, because I have a f**** game that nobody plays….

I can say that the Ghost Game is a kind of virtual Escape Game.
But Altair is not interested in your body.
Altair is interested in your virtual body: your name – your nickname – your pictogram.
And that, once you’re in the game, you’ll have lost it.

This principle allows me to play with anything: money – pledges – theatre tickets – what I want, it doesn’t matter : you come in, you bet and you lose the bet.

I specify that this is a game where I cheat to death so that in the end my players don’t lose > they leave “saved” from the disaster.
And ask to play again.

The mechanics of the game is simple and that you’ve got it : it is based on the name of the participants: your name appears complete: it’s up to you to make it ghostly by managing to make it disappear.
Obviously, it does not disappear so easily – and especially, in case of a wrong answer, it reappears – in part or in full.
Because everyone knows that a ghost appears, disappears, reappears.
The game is played in a limited time: if at the end of time there is a trace of you-ghost – so your name, you lose – and I keep your bet.

Based on this mechanism, which requires participants to respond quickly and well without making too many mistakes – but making them make mistakes anyway to spice up the game – I can decline the background ad infinitum and play on absolutely any subject.

With each correct answer, a letter disappears.
With each wrong answer, a letter reappears.
An answer considered absolutely horrible makes everything reappear.
Or an anti-gambling answer: this is where I place my Game Master’s cheating mechanism, since it is he who decides whether everything reappears or just part of the name.
It allows for a frantic rhythm – and lets people win in the end.

Yes, I admit it – I can’t imagine a game that doesn’t incorporate cheating mechanisms.
Besides, it is given in the starting rules: it thus returns all the blame for the possible “loss” of the player to the master of the game – and thus the player does not feel pathetic. A game you come out of by wondering what a moron you are is not, in my opinion, such a fun game.

If I want to use this game for my fabulous AA App – and frankly, I have to use this game for the AA App – then the subject of the Q&A will be about a show/video game/artist – with about 15 players online together, just to put a little competition – for a maximum of 5 minutes per game.
We can also plan a game of speed on “words” to be used for shows and/or games: this allows to have an AI as the master of the game, programmed to take the right and wrong answers and take the place of the cheater-cheater.
There are apps that play against each other.
None yet that give in the game of the Ghost.

The only difficulty I see here is how to cheat enough via an AI so that everyone has earned the right not to have lost their bet.

The good thing about this game is that once the player has managed to clear his name, he takes sides with those who remain and they all start helping the last ones: and that’s just plain “21st century spirit”: we play together to save each other.
In the 20th, it was: I play to crush you all.

And that’s why I claim, me and my little head, that Altair is a concept of the 21st century – because the mechanics are those of human relations that are currently being developed.

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Featured Image : from the famous Pacman Ghosts

25 Thoughts

      1. No, I want to make this a reality. We need hardware and software; this is a confusing industry- Networking with the kinds of professions and industries that make these “ghosts” reality.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. πŸ˜€ So there! I play – and I cheat, because I’m a girl (okay, not just because I’m a girl – because I like to cheat too) – I’ll go to sleep and send you the answer afterwards. Your game of the 5 sentences, right?

          Liked by 1 person

  1. I just realized I commented on the wrong post! hahahaha!
    Yes, do whatever suits you, clearly I am crazy and unapologetic!
    Good night, rest afterwards—tell me about anything you like!

    (filthy cheat!)

    πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. She always left everything behind her, her words, her hands, her laughter, her carelessness. One day a guy found them, kept them – and he only agreed to return half of them. What do you want to do in life with: one word out of two, one hand and only your carelessness? It must be said that the guy was charming – worse than a French lover – and he was very happy with his joke, it made his eyes laugh. It was hellish, he had won, so it was necessary to erect a completely unforgettable relationship between them – she was enchanted by it, the story tells.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Love the concept, and I think I know why we have become interested in what each other has to say….in your opening you talk about loving Pac-Man and admit you are very childish…❀️❀️❀️…me too!!! Hugs!

    Liked by 2 people

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